NEASA Digital Humanities Conference

This past weekend I went to my very first digital humanities conference with digital scholarship librarian, Heather Gilbert. The conference was the New England American Studies Association conference in Providence, Rhode Island. This may seem regionally far afield from Charleston, South Carolina, but finding a conference entirely dedicated to digital humanities is rare, so we jumped at the opportunity to present on APLA.

Our panel title was:

“African Passages, Lowcountry Adaptations”: Transforming Charleston’s Public History Landscape through a Digital Exhibition Project”

In the first sentence of my presentation, I noted that our title seemed bold. Then I continued, “How and why would an online exhibition project transform a city’s public history landscape, particularly one as established and highly trafficked as Charleston, South Carolina’s? A more accurate subtitle might be ‘attempting to transform public history to be more inclusive amidst various daunting challenges.'” From there I argued that despite these challenges, “developing inclusive public history in Charleston is crucial for historic sites and tours in terms of historic accuracy and public education, contemporary ethics of multiculturalism and diversity, and even in terms of good business practices for current visitor and local audiences.” Then I asserted that “digital public history interpretation collaboratively produced through the College of Charleston can help engage local sites and tours to help promote greater public awareness of these underrepresented histories in ways that are meaningful, cost-effective, and widely accessible.”

The rest of the presentation is too long for this blog post, but many exciting points came up in the question and session period afterwards, particularly after Heather Gilbert followed up my scholarly discussion of why inclusive digital history is important in Charleston with a multimedia presentation on how to actually make this happen. She particularly described what content management systems and open source software we are using, how we chose them, and discussed ways to organize staff workflows and skills within the limited resources of a small to medium sized academic library. We felt pretty good about how the presentation went, and if you are sorry you missed it, Dr. Benjamin Railton live-tweeted our panel! To find out some highlights from our presentation and many others, check out the many conference tweets (what would you expect from a digital humanities conference?) at #neasa2012 on Twitter.

Overall I found the conference to be really engaging, and validating for our interest in combining public history and digital humanities work through projects like APLA. “Digital Public Humanities” was even the title of the keynote address given by Dr. Steven Lubar from Brown University’s Center for Public Humanities and Culture Heritage. He posted slides from his presentation and his notes on his blog here: http://stevenlubar.wordpress.com/2012/10/14/387/

But I think one of the most exciting moments for me during our panel presentation was when a professor from Wheelock College in Massachusetts, Dr. Akeia Benard, told us how helpful our project discussion was for her own work in Newport, Rhode Island. Benard is trying to collaborate with local institutions in Newport to develop inclusive public history interpretation, particularly regarding the importance of the trans-Atlantic slave trade in Rhode Island. She described confronting numerous challenges in her work, similar to what many public history producers find in Charleston when they seek to develop effective representations of African American history during and after slavery. She thought our digital interpretation ideas could also have great potential in Newport. I found it strangely comforting to hear that Charleston is not the only area facing challenges in transforming public history, and exciting that digital projects could actually be a viable solution for some of these challenges, both within and outside of Charleston. I also hope in the future that various communities across the United States and even the Atlantic World may someday be able to collaborate on the various solutions we find for our similar challenges in addressing the complex history of slavery and its race and class legacies.

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